“Online audiences are as important as the real ones”: reflections and strategies on museum blogging

14045819341_defeb077c3_o

After having tried to figure out what are the trends of the Italian scenario in museum blogging, for our second in-depth focus on the topic we went overseas.

We decided to interview two leading figures in the international museum blogging sector: the first one works in a huge American institution, the second one, is an Australian well-known blogger who has embarked herself on an epic museum adventure.

Read more

Social Media and Mobile at the Musée du Quai Branly: Digital Synergies Toward an Integrated Strategy

14500146835_e6d4375627_k

Featuring indigenous art and cultures of Africa, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas, the Musée du Quai Branly is the newest of the major museums in Paris.

We had the opportunity to discuss with Sébastien Magro, New Media Manager at the museum, as well as Candice Chenu, New Technologies Project Manager. We peeked into the projects and the strategy of an institution that is geared toward a use of digital for interpretation and access – in the broadest sense –  of its collections.

Read more

From Twitter to Spotify: the Digital Presence of the Museum of Romanticism in Madrid

museo_romanticismo_facebook_17042013

Even if it celebrates its 90th anniversary this year, the Museum of Romanticism in Madrid is still in a very good shape, at least if judged by its online presence. This “Museum dedicated to the Nineteenth century in the middle of the Twenty-first century” opened in 1924 thanks to the efforts of the second Marquis de la Vega-Inclán, and it still shares the mission of its founder, bringing visitors closer to the life of the Romantic period, when modernity began.

After 8 years of renovation and reorganization of the collections, the Museum reopened in 2009, opening up the institution also to the potential of communication and interaction offered by organizing online events and exploiting the social networks. The Museum of Romanticism was the first among the Spanish museums to use Spotify and organize guided tours specifically designed for art bloggers. Thanks to a digital strategy that aims to engage with the public, and to a direct and friendly tone of voice, the Museum offers its public a 360 degrees visit, both online and off-line (just have a look at their “How romantic are you?” questionnaires, you won’t be disappointed).

Read more

Museum Blogging: Trends in the Italian Scenario

971678700_645b6744d6_o

We have often presented blogging platforms as an important tool for analysis and support to the non-institutional communication of museums and cultural organizations, seen how they are suited to presenting topics that could hardly find a space in the more traditional and institutional communication. We have also stressed, in more than one occasion, how important it is to have an organic and consistent content strategy.

In a mini-series of two posts, we will explore the world of blogging from within the museum, and listen to the voices and the ideas of professionals who are actually running museum blogs. We will start by introducing the world of Italian museum bloggers and will then pass to the international examples. The intention is to emphasize similarities and differences, common trends and unique characteristics which distinguish this important portion of digital communication. Read more